Advertisements

Happy Thanksgiving, A.D. 2018

Why at the hell on earth or in hell are e you here today, or anywhere else on the internet? Today is Thanksgiving Day, when you get a day off from the day’s news and a rare chance to reflect on all the rest of it, for which you can mostly be thankful for to God.
Better you should eat some turkey and drink some wine and be merry. for tomorrow we might die, as the Good Book suggests. Embrace yourself in the warmth of family and friends, and go ahead and watch some football if you’re so inclined. Tomorrow brings another dark and cold and dreary business day until the Christmas celebration of Christ’s birth, and we’ll be back on the glum job of noting it, yet no matter what comes in the next year this is as good a time as ever to be thankful for the best of life on God’s blessed Earth.
To all those who drop in even on days like today, we wish you all a Happy Thanksgiving and Merry Christmas and Happy New Year and a happy whatever other holiday your might celebrate at this otherwise miserable time of year.

— Bud Norman

Advertisements

Nothing Today

Christmas has passed, but the lights on our block will stay up into the New Year and a sort of holiday atmosphere will prevail through the last of the college football games, so we see no reason to concern ourselves with the latest events until then. After New Year’s it’s just a long, hard slog through the snow and the cold and the imperceptibly diminishing darkness toward spring, or “tornado season” as we call it around here, so there will be plenty of time and an appropriately gloomy atmosphere to consider the state of the world.
There are still the final fiddlings to be added to a novel soon to be e-pulished, too, and the house is still rather messy. A few old friends we can think of really should be contacted, as well, and with so much to do we can’t be expected to provide our usual profundities. We can only wish you a lingering holiday spirit, and thank you for your loyal readership, and hope that will suffice.

— Bud Norman

A Week Out of Whack

This is Thursday, so far as we can tell, but somehow it doesn’t seem so. Planting a holiday in the middle of a week has a discombobulating effect, and it might be some time before we regain our natural rhythm.

Middle-of-the-week holidays have a notoriously negative effect on worker productivity, which is not our forte no matter the vagaries of the calendar, and given the consistently sluggish state of the economy of late we expect this official lull should be particularly enervating. The government has attempted to rectify the problem by moving some presidential birthdays and other observances to Mondays, regardless of the actual date of what is being observed, but for obvious reasons they are unable to move the Fourth of July to the Second of July.

The news business always maintains at least a skeleton crew on Independence Day, even though there’s rarely any news that needs to be covered. Politicians traditionally avoid intruding on the public revelry, the stock markets are closed, the press release writers are enjoying the day off, and even the criminals tend to take it easy. That leaves the obligatory sappy feature story about people celebrating at the lake or someplace photogenic, but of course the people being written about are too busy celebrating to ever read the stories. On occasion some natural disaster will intervene without the slightest regard for anyone’s vacation schedule, and this year it was the big eastern storm of six whole days ago that still has left a million or so homes without power, but those people aren’t going to read the stories because they’re without power.

Foreign news of some significance will sometimes arise on the Fourth of July or some similar occasion, foreigners being rudely indifferent to America’s holidays. This time it was the deranged government of Iran launching a series of long range missile tests, accompanied by the usual saber-rattling rhetoric, a ominous development that is sure to rattle the oil markets and could lead to war and unthinkable disaster. The story was easily overlooked on the Fourth of July, but will be impossible to ignore over the coming days.

Worrying about such things is what the coming days are for, though, and anyone who chooses to attend to more personally satisfying pursuits on the lazy day will hear no condemnation from us. We’ll return to more weighty matters on Friday, which will seem like a Tuesday, and Tuesdays are always good for us.

— Bud Norman