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Happy Fifth of July

The sultry days of summer used to offer some respite from the relentless onslaught of news, but these days there’s no escaping the stuff. On Independence Day no American politician dares to violate the sacrosanct rule against making news, even the gleefully rule-breaking President Donald Trump, but the rest of the world cares less about the Fourth of July and had some cute Thai kids trapped in a cave, allies fulminating about Trump’s trade wars and spats about military spending, adversaries in Russia and North Korea and Syria and elsewhere are celebrating their recent victories, and on this Fifth of July all the desultory domestic news will be back.
The American and global economies are still in pretty good shape, but the American and global stock markets will probably have another down day because of the trade war Trump is intent on waging against the rest of the world. Although we observe that Americans are still generally quite pleasant with one another in their social and commercial interactions, the longstanding arguments about everything from immigration to abortion to abortion are becoming even angrier. The “Russia thing” grinds on, and Trump’s upcoming summit with Russian dictator and suspiciously good pal Vladimir Putin probably won’t put an end to that. Environmental Protection Agency director Scott Pruitt still stands credibly accused of more than a dozen outrageous corruption scandals, even if you approve of his deregulatory zeal, much of which we don’t mind ourselves, and it sure does look like Trump and his family are similarly profiting in previously unaccepted ways from their public service.
Along with everything else it makes for a bleak Fifth of July, but we try to put in in historical context. On the Fifth of July in 1776 our forefathers were embarked on a seven-year war that is still the deadliest in our nation’s history on a per capita basis, and on the Fifth of July in many other years the nation was mired in economic depression and deadly wars and far more heated domestic arguments, but so far America has persevered through it all.
Winning streaks always come to an eventual end, and eventually the American republic will come to the same end as its Greek and Roman models, but after the bratwurst and beer and fireworks and old friendships we enjoyed on the Fourth of July, we’ll start this Fifth of July with more yard work and a hopeful sense that we’ll end before our beloved America does.

— Bud Norman

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A Soggy Independence Day

The long holiday weekend has mostly been rained out around here, and even after a mostly dry but constantly cloudy Sunday the two rivers bounding our neighborhood are still swelling over the adjacent bike paths and the Big Ditch that the city fathers carved out on the west side to keep us above water at times like these is also full, but at least the forecasters are forecasting a clear and sunny Independence Day suitable for baseball and charcoaling burgers and drinking beer al fresco and shooting off fireworks without fear of setting off a grassfire in the still soggy fields. Most folks around here and around the rest of the country will happily take the day off from paying any attention to the stormy and soggy political news of this unprecedentedly crazy quadrennial presidential year, which is good news for presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.
The former First Lady and Senator and Secretary of State and formerly presumed First Woman President had another one of those disastrous news cycles that have so frequently interrupted the usual ongoing narrative about her historic and inevitable presidency, and she can only hope that most people weren’t paying any attention. First there was a well-documented and very damning report on her conduct as Secretary of State during the undeniably disastrous Benghazi incident, co-authored by our own well-liked Kansas Fourth District’s Rep. Mike Pompeo, and because it was already well-established that her conduct at every point was utterly appalling her more daring apologists were able to dismiss it was “nothing new.” Then came the news that her husband, a former two-term president and scandal-plagued disgrace in his own right, had happened to have a conversation about his grandchildren with the Attorney General who will ultimately decide if his wife is to be indicted on the very serious charges that her underlings at the Federal Bureau of Investigation are investigating, and that it happened in her private plane at a Phoenix Airport where he had been waiting around for 30 minutes before a supposed golf game that he intended to play in the 110-degree heat. Even the media that much prefer that storyline about Hillary Clinton’s historic and inevitable presidency had to admit that it looked bad and smelled fishy, and the resulting conspiracy ranged from the reliably left-wing Kathleen Parker’s worry that Bill Clinton was sabotaging his wife’s historic and otherwise inevitable presidency due to some subconscious impulseĀ to the reliably right-wing Rush Limbaugh’s worry that Slick Willie is once again outwitting the hapless Republicans, but in any case the presumptive Democratic nominee can only hope that few people were paying attention.
While we were attempting to navigate our way through the least water-logged streets of downtown Wichita towards home on Saturday the presumptive Democratic nominee and formerly presumed First Woman President was enduring a three-and-a-half-hour interrogation by eight agents of the FBI regarding a drearily long and still on-going criminal investigation into her e-mail and “family foundation” fund-raising practices while Secretary of State, and it all looks so hopeful she can only hope that much of the country was too preoccupied to notice. Those who have been paying attention but are somehow not committed to her historic have already concluded that she’s guilty, guilty, guilty, so she’ll either be somehow indicted or suffer yet another awful news cycle of scandal when she isn’t and that private plane meeting will suddenly look all the fishier, and in this crazy quadrennial election year she might wind as the First Woman President in any case.
She’s running against the presumptive Republican nominee, after all, and the scandal-plagued Donald J. Trump managed to create a relatively insignificant “Twitter” imbroglio that allowed the media to offer another shiny distraction from the presumptive Democratic nominee’s ongoing scandals. That will be largely overlooked, too, though, and we urge that everyone take the day off from all of it and watch some baseball and charcoal some burgers and drink a beer al fresco and shoot off fireworks and enjoy what’s left of America’s stormy and soggy independence. At least it will make it all the harder to burn it to the ground, as almost every seems intent on doing.

— Bud Norman